The one cute guy in any of my classes dropped so



davidbyrneout:

maliciousmelons:

my anaconda dont want none unless you got funds hun

Sexwork?

Gotta pay for 🍕🍕🍕 somehow



maliciousmelons:

my anaconda dont want none unless you got funds hun





Anonymously describe yourself in my inbox and I’ll tell you whether or not I’d date you.

squirt3l:

anchor-dxwn:

 

Do itttttttt(:



praxter:

City of Pillars by Drachenmeiger

bard-core:

"what videogames do you usually play?"

image

image

(Source: funquisitor)




Our bodies deserve more than to be war-torn and collateral, offering this fuckdom as a pathetic means to say, “I only know how to exist when I am wanted.” [x]

(Source: arunawaytrain)



theirhappyistooloud:

fucking thank you

plantbot:

as a skinny person, you are catered to and you don’t even realize it. did you ask for that? no and i understand that. but you will never cry your eyes out in a dressing room because even the largest size doesn’t fit. you will never deal with rejection from a guy solely because of your weight. you are socially accepted.

is any kind of body shaming disgusting? yes. but please don’t act like you’d rather be fat. 




omniastudios:

Celestial Lunar Oracle ring with deeply antiqued sterling silver, white topaz accent.

www.omniaoddities.com



preys:

Eventually we’re just gonna have to accept “ducking” as a swear word




the-exercist:

Reclaiming Fitspo: Jaqueline Ferreira

Ferreira is a Brazilian weightlifter. She stands at 5’5” and 163 pounds. She started lifting as a pre-teen, officially competing in student games when she turned 13. At that age, her natural talent and dedication to the sport was already drawing attention. 

In 2010, she was first in both Brazilian and South American heavyweight rankings. Twice, she successfully hit the Brazilian national record in the 69kg category, lifting 113 and 114 pounds. 

Now 27 years old, she competed in the 2012 London Olympics in the Women’s Heavyweight (-75kg) category. She exceeded expectations and ended up placing 8th with 230kg, getting beaten by the Polish Ewa Mizdal by only 1kg. 

Although her career is still blossoming, Ferreira is well worth keeping an eye on.

Click here to see all #Reclaiming-Fitspo profiles.




fortressofself:

tinyhousedarling:

The Peafield

this is so next level awesome



lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.
One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.
However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.
All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:







Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:


I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

Theme made by Max Davis.